Film Camera Macro Photos as a Snapshot of Society (March 2021)

I recently inherited a box of old no longer functioning older cameras from a friend, and decided to disassemble them all.  I didn't have any specific reason to, and I have taken apart older cameras before, but I was surprised at how struck I was when I popped the first bottom off of the first camera - a relatively simple camera, the Canon EOS Rebel Ti SLR 35mm film camera.  I was struck by how (frankly) beautiful the four little gears that were spread across the bottom of the camera (first photo below) and immediately decided to do macro photos of all the small workings inside the cameras, especially in the cameras that had a mixture of mechanical and electronic elements in them.  

On one level, I was thinking in terms of how important each tiny part of the camera is, and how if any of those functions - even a tiny screw - stopped working or broke, the photographer would no longer be able to use the camera.  

But this is true on a much deeper level as well when one looks at society.  Every person, every job, every role - no how matter how insignificant they may seem - is vital.  And often the most important people - who really make things run - are the most ignored, forgotten, and hidden people.  

I think one of the most magnificent things that I found while taking the cameras apart was on the Mamiya/Sekor 1000 DTL, which has a tiny gold chain running through the entire camera on little pullies (see photo below).  There is tremendous beauty in many hidden places - we would be wise to lift this beauty up in others when we seek it and see it.  

Paul in the New Testament writes beautifully about this as it pertains to the Christian faith and how the community of faith should view each other and support each other.  

I Corinthians 12:12-26 ESV: 

"For just as the body is one and has many members, and all the members of the body, though many, are one body, so it is with Christ.  For in on Spirit we were all baptized into one body - Jews or Greeks, slaves or free - and all were made to drink of one Spirit.

For the body does not consist of one member but of many.  If the foot should say, "Because I am not a hand, I do not belong to the body," that would not make it any less a part of the body.  And if the ear should say, "Because I am not an eye, I do not belong to the body," that would not make it any less a part of the body.  If the whole body were an eye, where would be the sense of hearing?  If the whole body were an ear, where would be the sense of smell?  But as it is, God arranged the members in the body, each one of them, as he chose.  If all were a single member, where would the body be?  As it is, there are many parts, yet one body.  

The eye cannot say to the hand, "I have no need of you," nor again the head to the feet, "I have no need of you."  On the contrary, the parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indespensible, and on those parts of the body that we think less honorable we bestow the greater honor, and our unpresentable parts are treated with greater modesty, which our more presentable parts do not require.  But God has so composed the body, giving greater honor to the part that lacked it, that there may be no division in the body, but that the members may have the same care for one another.  If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice together."  


Canon EOS Rebel Ti (introduced 2002)

Canon AE-1 Program (introduced 1981)


Canon AE-1 Program (introduced 1981)


Canon AE-1 Program (introduced 1981)


Mamiya/Sekor 1000 DTL (introduced 1968)


Honeywell Pentax ES (introduced 1972)


Honeywell Pentax ES (introduced 1972)


Konica Autoreflex TC (introduced 1976)


Konica Autoreflex TC (introduced 1976)


Canon T70 (introduced 1984)


Minolta SRT 101 (introduced 1966)


Minolta SRT 101 (introduced 1966)


Minolta SRT 101 (introduced 1966)


Nikon N80 (introduced 2000)


Nikon N80 (introduced 2000)


Nikon N80 (introduced 2000)


Nikon N80 (introduced 2000)


Nikon N80 (introduced 2000)


Nikon N80 (introduced 2000)


Minolta XD 11 (introduced 1977)


Minolta XD 11 (introduced 1977)


Minolta XD 11 (introduced 1977)


Minolta XD 11 (introduced 1977)



Kalimar 35mm Camera (model unclear, likely from the 1950s)


Minolta Super Circuit 3 (introduced 1969)


Minolta Super Circuit 3 (introduced 1969)


Pentax Program Plus (introduced 1984)
 

Pentax Program Plus (introduced 1984)


Minolta 5000AF (introduced 1986)


Minolta 5000AF (introduced 1986)


Nikon N70 (introduced 1994)


Nikon N70 (introduced 1994)


Canon EOS Rebel XS SLR (introduced 1993 - not the DLSR of the same name)
 

Canon EOS Rebel XS SLR (introduced 1993 - not the DLSR of the same name)


Screws from various cameras, with a dime for size comparison


Screws from various cameras 


Advent Hope: Health Care Workers in the Time of Covid-19

Each year our church (Awaken Community in St. Paul) does an Advent Series, focusing on a variety of themes including darkness and hope. My art typically leans more towards the darker side, but in an especially turbulent year I decided to focus instead on hope.

Due to the SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic in 2020, masks have been an important part of both battling the infection and keeping healthcare workers safe, while also providing safe care. Working in hospice I've now had a great deal of patients and met a great number of family members who I only know by their eyes and not the rest of their faces - and what I find amazing is how much we can understand and communicate from just using our eyes for facial expressions. 

A typical (and appropriate) image that we've been seeing in the media now is of healthcare workers wearing PPE and looking exhausted, with deep sadness in their eyes.  These are important images, with many reasons for that sadness.  For these portraits however, I decided to do the opposite.  These 10 images are of 10 of my current co-workers wearing some of the different masks and other PPE that we wear, but the twist is that under the masks everyone is smiling - because part of our role as healthcare workers is to give hope.  I opted to not do a self-portrait in PPE for this series as I wanted to focus on those people who I see throughout the day (though I was only able to photograph a handful of my co-workers as I had a short window once I started the project before I needed to complete it). 

Thank you to these friends and to all healthcare workers who are striving to help during these difficult times. 


Jen, Hospice RN Case Manager
Stephanie, Hospice Medical Social Worker



Ashley, Hospice RN Case Manager

Jo, Facility RN

Michael, Hospice Medical Social Worker

Florence, Hospital Medical Social Worker

Sheila, Hospice LPN

Amber, Hospice Medical Social Worker

Penny, Hospice Resource RN

Sue, Hospice Music Therapist